3 Classic Books to Prepare Us for the AI Revolution

At this stage, it seems that not much can be done to stop the AI Revolution from taking place. Let us have a look at the possible scenarios that may play out if AI is given full autonomy, or if regulation fails to control it. Here are three classic books about governance, power, control, and survival, which capture the social issues of concern in today's debates about AI. The fictional scenarios in these books use metaphoric and allegoric forms to convey messages of importance about identity, individuality, the misuse and abuse of power, and the fragility and limitations of humanity.

The impact of trauma on decision-making: Jane Eyre’s journey from abuse to agency in the Victorian era

In this research paper, I will closely analyse the character traits of the downtrodden protagonist, Jane Eyre, to ascertain how she reaches empowerment in adulthood after a childhood of abuse, trauma, grief and neglect in Victorian England. In particular, I will pay attention to Jane’s decision-making processes, as this is the key to understanding her journey to freedom and empowerment. As a female, Jane experiences gender-based abuse on a societal level, and as a destitute orphan, she experiences physical, emotional, and spiritual abuse on a personal level. With abuse being predominant in every stage of Jane’s life, she is tasked with the heavy burden of overcoming trauma if she is to make a success of her life and to live happily. Jane must make wise and informed, life-altering decisions to avoid lifelong suffering.

Resisting patriarchy in Africa: Desire and agency in ‘Woman at Point Zero’ and ‘Under the Udala Trees’  

Woman at Point Zero by Nawal El Saadawi and Under the Udala Trees by Chinelo Okparanta are two very different African novels, yet both bring attention to gender-based oppression and patriarchy in Africa. In both novels, there are several female characters who cope with patriarchy in different ways. Some women submit to the system, while others resist it. There are also women who manipulate the system to their advantage, while other women outrightly oppose it. In this essay, I will focus on an exploration of the main female protagonists, and how they resist the different types of patriarchy challenging them.

Analysing the motif of time in ‘Mrs. Dalloway’ and ‘The Hours’

In both novels, time is used to represent the temporary nature of life. Clocks are used to symbolise the urgency which accompanies time - this places emphasis on the mortality of life. Furthermore, both novels express the nonlinear nature of time, which juxtaposes the temporary nature of life with the permanent nature of memories (both positive and negative memories). In this essay, I will demonstrate that Cunningham uses the same representations of time as Woolf does in her novel. Additionally, I will explain the contextual settings of both novels to demonstrate that time is relevant inside and outside of these two intertextual novels. 

The rise of womanism in South African praise poetry: Dismantling past traditions of patriarchy 

In this essay, I will pay particular attention to South African praise poetry to demonstrate that there is a slow shift away from patriarchy towards inclusivity. The genre of praise poetry has progressed from being predominantly male to include more female poets who have gained fame and respect across the African continent. I will begin with a discussion of the past, before addressing the current shift away from patriarchy. 

Life lessons from a tragic hero in ‘Things Fall Apart’ by Chinua Achebe

Okonkwo, in Chinua Achebe's 'Things Fall Apart', is a complex character who teaches us many lessons about life, society, and culture. According to the definition of a tragic hero in literature, one could easily consider Okonkwo a tragic hero. Okonkwo's life and death reveal tragedies which can be avoided with careful judgment and informed decision-making. In this essay, I will outline the elements of a tragic hero as they pertain to Okonkwo, and conclude with some thoughts on how to avoid such tragic endings.

Create a website or blog at WordPress.com

Up ↑